Tag Archives: bluetooth

Samsung ATIV S passes through Bluetooth SIG, brings along Bluetooth contact import

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The Samsung GT-i8750 has passed through the Bluetooth SIG.  The certification does not reveal any new Bluetooth profiles, referring to the generic Windows Phone 8 version, except for a new Bluetooth Contacts Import feature, something which we first saw on Nokia’s Windows Phones.

The feature hopefully indicates that Samsung is getting a bit more serious about moving some of their Android customers over to Windows Phone for their next handset.

See the entry at the Bluetooth SIG here.

Nokia Purity Pro wireless headphones demoed on video

Unleashthephones.com managed to catch a hands-on demo of Nokia’s new Purity Pro wireless headphones and managed to answer many of the questions readers have raised.

Firstly, battery life is pretty good, rated at 24 hours of wireless streaming with noise cancelation enabled.

Next they were able to confirm that even when battery does run out you will still be able to use the headphones wired.

Lastly they showed the device does charge via microUSB.

See some pictures at Unleashthephones.com here.

Via Mynokiablog.com

What is Nokia’s Alpha Engine?

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A new Nokia product has been certified by the Bluetooth SIG, and this one is a bit mysterious, but also very tantalizing.

The entry for the  so-called “Alpha engine controller subsystem” does not reveal much, except that it runs on the latest Bluetooth 4.0 protocol, but the Alpha moniker does of course ring a bell, with the Windows Phone 8 handset with the code-name Juggernaut Alpha showing up all over the place.

Could this then be part of the first Nokia Windows Phone 8 handset showing up on the Bluetooth SIG, running Bluetooth 4.0 rather than the disappointing Bluetooth 3.1 in the general Windows Phone 8 certification?  I guess we will find out soon enough at Nokia World 2012 on the 5th September 2012.

See the entry at the Bluetooth SIG here.

Windows Phone 8 Bluetooth profiles revealed, OBEX confirmed

Design Name Windows Phone 8
Member Company Microsoft Corporation
Specification Name 3.1
Design Model Number Windows Phone 8
Software Version Number 8.0
Qualification Assessment Date August/06/2012
Listing Date August/06/2012
Design Description Mobile Phone Operating System

Profile / Protocol Role / Version (If Any)
Serial Port Profile  
Service Discovery Application Profile Local Device (LocDev)
Audio/Video Control Transport Protocol AVCTP 1.3
Target
Audio/Video Remote Control Profile
AVRCP v1.4
Target
Object Push Profile Object Push Client
Object Push Server
Generic Audio/Video Distribution Profile Acceptor
GAVDP 1.2
Initiator
Audio/Video Distribution Transport Protocol Acceptor
AVDTP 1.2
Initiator
Source
Advanced Audio Distribution Profile A2DP 1.2
Source (SRC)
Hands-Free Profile Audio Gateway (AG)
CVSD audio coding over SCO
Hands-Free Profile 1.5
Phone Book Access Profile PSE

imageThe Windows Phone 8 Bluetooth profile list has finally been posted at the Bluetooth SIG, and it confirms that Windows Phones will be able to both send and receive objects, though the exact nature of the data which can be transferred is still unknown.

OBEX is the only new profile added since Windows Phone 7.5, but the Audio/Video Remote Control Profile was updated from version 1.3 to 1.4, which adds the ability to browse and search media on media servers over Bluetooth,  and the Audio/Video Control Transport Protocol was also updated from version 1.0 to version 1.3.

It appears the headset profile was also dropped, and the serial protocol remains missing, but we already know developers will have access to this feature.

Unfortunately the version of Bluetooth supported is version 3, rather than the latest version 4, which adds Bluetooth Low Energy, which allows phones to communicate with low energy devices such as sensors and smart watches.

The profile can be seen here.

Leaked Windows Phone 8 SDK confirms Peer to Peer Bluetooth functionality

Today’s leaked developer SDK has revealed one interesting new feature.  Developers will be able to access the Bluetooth stack via the API and allow applications to communicate from one handset to another using the short-range technology.

Developers will also be able to program the stack to connect to peripherals such as heart rate monitors via Bluetooth.

Windows Phone 8 handsets will also be able to discover other Windows Phones and devices in their proximity using the new API features, making it a substitute for NFC if this is not available.

The documentation does not make reference to other Bluetooth Stack improvements, but it does suggest developers will have more freedom to add what is missing in Windows Phone 8.

Windows 8 Bluetooth stack pass through certification

Service Discovery Application Profile Local Device (LocDev)
Audio/Video Control Transport Protocol AVCTP 1.2
Target
Audio/Video Remote Control Profile AVRCP 1.3
Target
Dial-Up Networking Profile Data Terminal (DT)
Packet connections
Object Push Profile Object Push Client
Object Push Server
Generic Audio/Video Distribution Profile Acceptor
GAVDP 1.2
Initiator
Audio/Video Distribution Transport Protocol Acceptor
AVDTP 1.2
Initiator
Source
Personal Area Networking Profile PAN User
Hardcopy Cable Replacement Profile Client (C)
Human Interface Device Host, Report protocol
Advanced Audio Distribution Profile A2DP 1.2
Source (SRC)
Hands-Free Profile Audio Gateway (AG)
CVSD audio coding over SCO
Hands-Free Profile 1.5
Generic Attribute Profile Attribute Protocol Supported over LE
Generic Attribute Profile Client
Generic Attribute Profile Server
Attribute Protocol Attribute Protocol Client
Attribute Protocol Server
Attribute Protocol Supported over LE
Security Manager Protocol
HID over GATT Profile Profile supported over LE
Report Host

The Windows 8 Bluetooth stack has just passed through the Bluetooth SIG certification.  The details reveal the usual collection of HID, A2DP, PAN and OBEX profiles, which should reassure Windows 8 buyers that they will not be losing functionality.

What is of course more relevant to Windows Phone users is that Windows Phone 8 is expected to feature very similar drivers to Windows 8, suggesting we may see more of the same profiles on Windows Phone 8 also.  Profiles like Object Push are of course much in demand and long overdue on Windows Phone.

All should be revealed in a few days however after the Windows Phone summit on the 20th next week.

In the mean time, see the certification at the Bluetooth SIG here.

Nokia Lumia 900 passes through Bluetooth Certification

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Likely timed with the original expected release date of the AT&T Nokia Lumia 900, the handset’s Bluetooth certification has just popped up at Bluetooth.org.

The certification reveals the same standard Windows Phone Bluetooth profiles, except for the Bluetooth address book data transfer app, which Nokia added as their own extension.

We suggest of Nokia wants to use their freedom to extend Windows Phone Bluetooth features, they may want to add Bluetooth File Transfer for when they sell their phones in emerging markets.

See the entry here.

Microsoft working on making Windows Phone 8 feature competitive with Android and iPhone

Today’s round up of Microsoft job postings shows Microsoft is not slacking in their ambition with Windows Phone development at all, especially for the next major version.

In their 17/11/11 advertisement for a Software Development Engineer In Test Microsoft speaks of testing “enabling code provided in the BSP” to support “new capabilities to make the next version of the Windows Phone platform a compelling direct competitor with Apple’s iPhone and Google’s Android phone.”

This could be related to the many advanced features found in modern mobile chipsets  which are not generally exploited by Windows Phone 7 yet, including of course dual processor and high screen resolution support.

Part of this feature set may be better Bluetooth support in the OS, with Microsoft also advertising on the 17/11/11 for a Program Manager to help the team with “new chipsets, new capabilities, and new use cases are all being worked on feverishly to deliver enjoyable and delightful customer experiences in the next release of Windows Phone.”  Maybe that Bluetooth 4.0 support is coming after all.

Lastly Microsoft is also advertising for a Software Development Engineer in Test to “help ensure our devices are manageable at the personal, enterprise and operator levels, enabling powerful security features, across applications and device setting”, hopefully providing those much desired and missing enterprise features needed to make Windows Phone big in business.

It is pretty clear Microsoft has finished laying the foundation of Windows Phone with 7.0 and 7.5, and Version 8 make sure there are no missing features left over to hold the OS back.

Poll: Bluetooth issues with Windows Phone 7 Mango?

imageWindows Phone Mango has a new Bluetooth stack, including an updated Hands Free profile,  and it may be causing users who had no problems with NoDo to suddenly have pairing and reliability issues with Mango.

I myself have had Bluetooth connecting issues with my built-in car kit, and I have had reports from other readers of similar problems.

It would be useful to see how wide-spread these problems are. Let us know your experience in the poll and comments below.

[poll id=”37]

Windows Phone Mango Bluetooth stack updated, but not much



Design Name Windows Phone 7
Subsetted Designs
Date Created Type PICS
Apr 5, 2011 Main PICS
Member Company Microsoft Corporation
Specification Name 2.1+EDR
Design Model Number Windows Phone 7
Hardware Version Number N/A
Software Version Number 7.5
Qualification Assessment Date June/05/2011
Listing Date June/05/2011
Design Description Mobile Phone Operating System
Product Type Host Subsystem
Profile / Protocol Role / Version (If Any)
Headset Profile Audio Gateway (AG)
Headset Profile v1.1
Service Discovery Protocol  
Logical Link Control and Adaptation Protocol  
Generic Access Profile  
Serial Port Profile  
Audio/Video Control Transport Protocol AVCTP 1.0 Target
Audio/Video Remote Control Profile AVRCP 1.3 Target
Generic Audio/Video Distribution Profile Acceptor
GAVDP 1.2
Initiator
Audio/Video Distribution Transport Protocol Acceptor
AVDTP 1.2
Initiator
Source
Advanced Audio Distribution Profile A2DP 1.2
Source (SRC)
Hands-Free Profile Audio Gateway (AG)
CVSD audio coding over SCO
Hands-Free Profile 1.5
Phone Book Access Profile PSE
Host Controller Interface  

Microsoft has updated the Bluetooth stack in Windows Phone 7.5, with the new stack receiving Bluetooth SIG approval on the 5th June 2011.

New is Hand-Free Profile 1.5, which should mean better support for Bluetooth car kits. Also updated is the AVRCP (Audio Video Remote Control Protocol) from version 1.0 to 1.3, which brings track and other meta-data information transmission and playback status information (paused, stopped, etc).

Unfortunately it still does not bring the stack up to even iOS 4 level, which supports Personal Area Network (PAN) profile, often used of peer to peer multi-player gaming and Human Interface Device Profile, used for Bluetooth keyboards and controllers.

See the profile at the Bluetooth SIG here.

Improved Bluetooth support coming to Windows Phone 7

When searching the Bluetooth.org database for new WP7 handsets it is pretty easy to recognize phones running the OS.  They tend to be the only ones with extremely limited profile support, mainly A2DP, Headset Profile and Phone book Access.

If this job posting below is anything to go by, this may change in the future.  The brief asks for a sharp software developer with “hands-on Bluetooth protocol expertise” and “experience in implementing recent Bluetooth profiles on any OS platform ” to “help us in our quest to deliver the best Bluetooth experience of any smartphone platform”.  For anyone who miss the deep Bluetooth protocol support of Windows Mobile this sounds like just what the doctor ordered.

See the full ad after the break.

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PS3 Sixaxis used to control Windows Mobile Playstation emulator – the circle is complete

The FPSECE Playstation emulator has certainly been a pretty cool application on Windows Mobile, but most of the time the games could not be played full screen as much of the screen had to be used to emulate the control buttons

Cobaltikus has however managed to develop a pretty amazing application designed for a Bluetooth controller many of us may have in our home already – the Playstation Sixaxis Bluetooth controller for the PS3.

His application, which is suitable for devices running both the Microsoft and Widcomm stack, seems to work pretty well in the video above, and can be downloaded for free in this XDA-Developer thread here.

Has any of our readers given it a go? Let us know your experience below.

Bluetooth 4.0 spec close to finalization

bluetoothlogoPress Release: Today from its annual All Hands Meeting in Seattle, the Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) unveiled more information about its forthcoming Bluetooth Core Specification Version 4.0, with the hallmark feature of low energy technology. Bluetooth v4.0, expected to be brought to market by the end of Q2, will feature a powerful low energy mode designed to enable expansion of the technology in m-health, sports and fitness, security and home entertainment scenarios where button-cell battery devices proliferate.

"Bluetooth v4.0 throws open the doors to a host of new markets for Bluetooth manufacturers and products such as watches, remote controls, and a variety of medical and in-home sensors. Many of these products run on button-cell batteries that must last for years versus hours and will also benefit from the longer range enabled by this new version of the Bluetooth specification," said Michael Foley, Ph.D., executive director of the Bluetooth SIG.

Bluetooth v4.0 is like three specifications in one – Classic Bluetooth technology, Bluetooth low energy technology, and Bluetooth high speed technology– all which can be combined or used separately in different devices according to their functionality. For example, sensors like those in pedometers and glucose monitors will run only low energy technology, thus saving power, cost and space within the device. Watches will take advantage of both low energy technology while collecting data from fitness sensors on the body as well as Classic Bluetooth technology when sending that information to a PC, or separately displaying caller ID information when wirelessly connected to a mobile phone. Mobile phones and PCs, which support the widest range of uses, will utilize the full package with Classic, low energy and high speed technology running side by side.

As with previous versions of the specification, the range of the Bluetooth v4.0 radio may be optimized according to application. The majority of Bluetooth devices on the market today include the basic 30 foot, or 10 meter, range of the Classic Bluetooth radio, but there is no limit imposed by the Specification. With Bluetooth v4.0, manufacturers may choose to optimize range to 200 feet and beyond, particularly for in-home sensor applications where longer range is a necessity.

Bluetooth v4.0 was recently named one of the "10 Mobile Technologies to Watch in 2010 and 2011" by Gartner, Inc. Technologies chosen for the list were selected on their potential to evolve and impact short-term mobile strategies and policies. Specifically, Bluetooth v4.0 is cited to have significant impact on the fitness, healthcare and environmental control industries.

Availability

The specification for Bluetooth v4.0 with the hallmark feature of low energy technology was first introduced in December 2009. Samples of sensors utilizing this specification are available from some silicon manufacturers today. Integration of Bluetooth low energy wireless technology within the Bluetooth specification will be completed before June 30, 2010. Upon completion, mobile phone and PC manufacturers may enhance their Bluetooth product offerings with support for Bluetooth low energy wireless technology.

End-user devices with Bluetooth v4.0 are expected to reach the market in late 2010 or early 2011.

Comment

The question of what’s next for our smartphones come up occasionally.  At present it appears to be largely about integrating with online services, but the rise of location-based services start bringing the technology closer to home, and eventually technologies like Bluetooth 4.0 will allow us not just to interact effectively with services on the internet, but also with your DVR and running machine and fridge. In the coming future, it appears we will be welded even more to the phone we carry in our pocket.

Via Engadget.com